Thursday, 25 June 2015

The Gold Medlist International Turban Coach Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria

About Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria

Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria was born in village Mallu Wala, Dist Ferozepur (Punjab) on 26th March, 1989. He did his schooling from Mallu Wala and completed his Graduation from Guru Nanak College, Ferozepur Cantt. His love for turban tying started from the mere age of 11  years when he had just enetered class 6th. The style he choose was one of the prevelent at those times i.e. Pochvi Pagg (Morni). His passion for turban was passed down by his elder brother, Gurmeet Singh Ferozepuria who at that time used to tie a turban and go to school. In his early days of wearing a turban he choose to tie a 5.5m double pagg which now has changed to 8m. The first time he wore a turban that was tied by his elder brother. So when he went to school with his turban on he was appreciated by his fellow classmates and even his school teachers. They all had smiles on their faces when they saw that even a 11 year old child had started wearing a turban to school. This appreciation for Manjeet meant much more which pumped him up to tie a much better turban for the next day to his school and many days to come. With all this inspiration and love Manjeet had a dream to take the SIKH DASTAAR to such a level in the world that every young sikh boy would be seen in a well tied turban. In almost a span of a week's time he had mastered the art of tying a dastaar. 

Large Blog Image As the days passed by he often use  to see  pamphlets/posters of turban  tying competion in  his village and  some even in other cities. So he  started participating in them. He still  remembers  the first competition he  had participated in the year 2000  where he had stood Third place and  the person who stood first joked with  him that you could never tie a turban  like me and achieve a first place. This  very statement hit him very hard on  his mind and he pledged to himself that he would prove the world wrong and tie a beaturiful turban which would be appreciated by each and everyone. In the very next competition he again faced the same person who had joked with him but to his suprise he outlasted him and achieved the first position. He was awarded a certificate and trophy which still is a priced possession for him and is arranged with all his achievement. Post these inter distric turban competititions Manjeet started visiting other states and won many awards their also. Till date he has yet to any such competition. Few years passed by and Manjeet had completed his 10+2 (high school). One day when he had to attend a family function and was tying his turban his mother interrupted and got angry at him and said that, "Better than you were those elderly people who took 5 to 7 minutes to tie a turban while you have already taken 25 minutes and not even finished." Gathering these thoughts Manjeet got one thing right in his mind that he cannot waste so much time in tying the turban and that he must be ready in about 5 to 7 minutes. So first he mastered the timing aspect and took merely 10 minutes. But he was not satisfied and thought he could do better. So he kept on trying again and again. In about 3 to 4 months time he had practicised so hard that he brought down his timing to about 3 minutes. Manjeet then learnt all the different styles of turban tying like Amritsari,Patiala Shahi & Dumala. Once he had broken the time barrier. he wanted to do something which no one has ever tried i.e. to tie a turban without a mirror. This was also acheived in a few months. Next he wanted to tie turban's in situations people haven't thought of such as while walking,riding pillion to a biker/car etc. With hard work and dedication the seeds sown once had borne fruits and that everything was achieved in a certain time frame. In the year 2007 while Manjeet was graduating from college his one and only hobby that was turban tying was in full swing and he had thought of opening a Dastaar Academy. With support from his family and friends he opened up the same in the city of Bathinda. This academy was open for the youth to learn from Ferozepuria and even if someone was getting married would he visit them and tie their turbans. As few months passed by many ideas came to his mind and one such was to tie a turban blind folded. Many people till date think this is not possible but Manjeet has proved everyone wrong by doing such. Initially he tied his own turban blind folded and later on went on tying others turban with his eyes blinded. One had to see to believe that even blind folded Manjeet not only gave a proper shape to the turban but also each and every "lard" from starting to the end was titch perfect with accuracy. To some people it looked like it was the work of an artesian. With this very moment Manjeet's confidence grew many folds. In 2012,at the 3rd World Kabaddi Cup, Guru Nanak Stadium, Ludhiana, Manjeet was invited by the title Sponsor to perform at the closing ceremony. His performance was appreciated by the likes of Prakash & Sukhbir Singh Badal. Later on he was also interviewed by many TV NEWS CHANNEL like PTC,Chardikala Time,CNEV News, Pothimala Halchal, Fast Way News, 7C News, Sahara Canada,Jagoo Punjab,MH1 News,Live Today,Day & Night News Channel. Apart from the on and off interviews, Star Plus called upon Manjeet for a very special performance for their show "Aapka Star Aapka Shahar" which took place in Sector-17, Chandigarh which aired on the television on 29th June, 2014 where Manjeet was successful in tying a persons turban in under a minute (precisely 59 seconds). Folllowing this programme Manjeet had other plans in relation to turban tying, one of which was to tie someone else's turban blind folded in something as less than 22 seconds. He achieved this feat with gods grace on 5th July, 2014 in Gurudwara Dukh Niwaran Sahib, Patiala. Manjeet's popularity grew by many folds and he was often invited for judgement at various state and national level turban tying competition all around India(Delhi,Punjab,Haryana,Jammu). Internationally, Manjeet has had the oppurtuntity to visit Malayasia and Singapore where he was called upon by his fans so that they could learn how to tie a turban just like him.

Ferozpuria Dastar Academy

 As previously mentioned in the  events of his life, Manjeet Singh  Ferozepuria Dastaar Academy  was given birth in April, 2007  while Manjeet was graduating  from college. This academy till  date stands at the same  location i.e. Street 12, Ajit Road  (Near Dhillon Hospital),  Bathinda (Punjab). People from  all states
and all ages whether  it be Maharashtra,  Kolkatta,Srinagar, Panipat,  Delhi, United States of America, Canada ,UK etc have had the oppurtunity to come and learn at the Academy the different styles of Pagg. The training being imparted at this very institution is very methodological. In no sense has a shortcut been applied to learn this very art of turban tying. In less than 3 days and as much as 10 days one can learn any style of pagri from Manjeet's Academy. 2007 to present Manjeet has trained almost over 60,000 people. He's also been invited by people all around the globe for turban tying at their marriages. With this academy located in Bathinda, Manjeet plans to expand it to other major cities which are easily accessed and can cater to a larger mass of people.

The Tribune Turban Article 

Dastar or turban is the pride of the Sikh community — a symbol that sets it apart; a symbol of honour, courage, and reverence for the Sikh Gurus and their teachings. Tying the traditional 8-metre turban needs a deft hand, as the soft 3x4 copy muslin is swiftly folded and neatly pleated around the head. The younger generation of Sikhs, especially in foreign lands, is not familiar with the technique; the reams of cloth can be challenging. And this is where Manjit Singh Ferozepuria comes in, to lend a helping hand. A turban wizard, Manjit Singh can tie his turban blindfolded, precise to the minutest details, in 22 seconds flat. Not just that, blindfolded, he can also tie a turban on another head. What pushed Manjit Singh to it, however, has its genesis in an unpleasant experience. “It happened one day when I was in college in 2010. A friend, Baljinder Singh, poked fun at me while I was tying my turban before rushing for the classes. He called me a paindu Yankee (villager attempting to look western). I was deeply offended, following which we had an animated discussion on the legacy behind the turban as a symbol, bestowed by the 10th Guru, Guru Gobind Singh, on the Khalsa Panth,” says Manjit Singh, who is much-sought-after by the Indian community abroad to teach their children the art of tying a turban. “I went through a lot of inner turmoil. I thought I should do something to carry on the legacy of dastaar as a symbol of spirituality and self-respect. I quit studies after my graduation from DAV College, Bathinda. There has been no looking back. I got a lot of local support from youngsters who were interested in carrying a neat look. I made my passion, my profession. Ironically, I also tied the turban of Baljinder Singh on his wedding,” chuckles Manjit Singh. Hailing from Malluwala village in Ferozepur district, 25-year-old Manjit has been holding such classes in Singapore and Malaysia to teach Sikh youths how to tie a turban. He will be travelling to Europe this month to hold workshops in various countries. A whopping 7.8 lakh follow him on his Facebook account. “People these days,” says Manjit Singh “are experimenting with their turban, unlike earlier times when the shape of a turban was associated with particular communities. There are nearly a dozen ways to sport a turban. I am good at Pochvin, Patiala Shahi, Amritsar Dhamala, Chand Tora Dhamala and Patka Keski styles. I get requests for weaving the knots for the headgear of Hindu grooms as well, besides requests from youths to give them the ‘Bhagat Singh look’ on special occasions.” Manjit Singh hogged headlines in local newspapers when he tied a turban straddling two motorcycles during the international kabaddi match hosted by the Punjab Government in 2013. For this, the crowd gave him a standing ovation. Manjit Singh has also taught Anantvir Singh, son of Punjab Deputy Chief Minister Sukhbir Singh Badal, how to tie a turban,

The International Turban Events

I am going to share about a person which is the one of the great personality in sikh culture and traditions. His name is Sardar Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria ( International Turban coach). Now  I am going to share about his Europe tour where he spent 2 months over there and he wants to share some joyful moments. First of all he wants to thank Sardar Balwinder Singh Gurdaspuria How is a great fan of Sardar Manjeet Singh and was following him through social sites (facebook, wikipedia, youtube etc) and he Was influenced By his turban art and sponcered him to europe as a turban trainer to develop the growing sikh culture in europeon countries... Germany Gori BoyNow i am going to share about his journey, He took flight from IGT Delhi on April 5th to Germany Dusseldorf Airpot. He was welcomed by Sardar Balwinder Singh and By his Sew friends. He started his first Turban Training Camp on April 7th Augsburg City Germany. Lot of youth came to join training camp even they were Not sikh people but they Were inspired and influenced by sikhism and took part in the camp. Camp was organised at Gurdwara Singh Sabha(Germany). He organised camp over there for 3 days and lot of fans from india and other different parts of europe influenced from this camp And More Over That Manjeet SinghGot 50 Thousant Likes in a single day of the camp and got invitation from many other countries of europe . He organised his next camps in Munchen city at Gurdwara Nanak Sabha, Frankfurt city at Gurdwara Sikh centre, Kolon city at Gurdwara Shabad Parkash, Asenberg city at Gurdwara Nanaksar. Sardar Manjeet Singh and Sardar Balwinder Singh was honoured by Gurdwara parbhandak society Nanaksar,Asenberg. Sardar manjeet Singh further organised his turban training camps in Austria, Poland, Holland, Spain, Belgian, France. On the behalf  of Sardar Kulwant Singh Khalsa he organised a special turban training  camps in Italy and when he Had arrived at Rome airport upto 100 youth was waiting for welome in Italy. First camp in Italy was organised at Gurdwara Singh sabha, Flour city and other camps were organised at Gurdwara’s Kilgidhar, Guru Nanak Dev Ji.

The Gold Medlist Turban Coach 

One of the exciting moment in the life of Sardar Manjeet Singh when he got Gold Medal on May 5th  from the societies Desmesh Force and  Cultura Sikh Nojawan Sabha at Gurdwara Baba Makhan Shah Lubana, Borgo San Giacomo city, Italy .Gold Madlist Turban Coach Manjeet Singh FerozpuriaIts was really a memorable tour From where he Had never expected so much respect and love from the peoples around the world. He Gave message to sikh community any sikh around the world wants to take turban traning from him, He is ready to serve his self  by the  name of Khalsa at Every corner of the world . 

Thursday, 5 February 2015

Best World Number One Turban Training Centre India Punjab Bathinda, Dastar Academy , Pagri Centre ,Video Image photo Wallpaper

Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria was born in village Mallu Wala, Dist Ferozepur (Punjab) on 26th March, 1989. He did his schooling from Mallu Wala and completed his Graduation from Guru Nanak College, Ferozepur Cantt. His love for turban tying started from the mere age of 11 years when he had just enetered class 6th. The style he choose was one of the prevelent at those times Tie. Pochvi Pagg (Morni). His passion for turban was passed down by his elder brother, Gurmeet Singh Ferozepuria who at that time used to tie a turban and go to school. In his early days of wearing a turban he choose to tie a 5.5m double pagg which now has changed to 8m. The first time he wore a turban that was tied by his elder brother. So when he went to school with his turban on he was appreciated by his fellow classmates and even his school teachers. They all had smiles on their faces when they saw that even a 11 year old child had started wearing a turban to school. This appreciation for Manjeet meant much more which pumped him up to tie a much better turban for the next day to his school and many days to come. With all this inspiration and love Manjeet had a dream to take the SIKH DASTAAR to such a level in the world that every young sikh boy would be seen in a well tied turban. In almost a span of a week's time he had mastered the art of tying a dastaar.
 As the days passed by he often use to see pamphlets/posters of turban tying competion in his village and some even in other cities. So he started participating in them. He still remembers the first competition he had participated in the year 2000 where he had stood Third place and the person who stood first joked with him that you could never tie a turban like me and achieve a first place. This very statement hit him very hard on his mind and he pledged to himself that he would prove the world wrong and tie a beaturiful turban which would be appreciated by each and everyone. In the very next competition he again faced the same person who had joked with him but to his suprise he outlasted him and achieved the first position. He was awarded a certificate and trophy which still is a priced possession for him and is arranged with all his achievement. Post these inter distric turban competititions Manjeet started visiting other states and won many awards their also. Till date he has yet to any such competition. Few years passed by and Manjeet had completed his 10+2 (high school). One day when he had to attend a family function and was tying his turban his mother interrupted and got angry at him and said that, "Better than you were those elderly people who took 5 to 7 minutes to tie a turban while you have already taken 25 minutes and not even finished." Gathering these thoughts Manjeet got one thing right in his mind that he cannot waste so much time in tying the turban and that he must be ready in about 5 to 7 minutes. So first he mastered the timing aspect and took merely 10 minutes. But he was not satisfied and thought he could do better. So he kept on trying again and again. In about 3 to 4 months time he had practicised so hard that he brought down his timing to about 3 minutes. Manjeet then learnt all the different styles of turban tying like Amritsari,Patiala Shahi & Dumala. Once he had broken the time barrier. he wanted to do something which no one has ever tried i.e. to tie a turban without a mirror. This was also acheived in a few months. Next he wanted to tie turban's in situations people haven't thought of such as while walking,riding pillion to a biker/car etc. With hard work and dedication the seeds sown once had borne fruits and that everything was achieved in a certain time frame.

In the year 2007 while Manjeet was graduating from college his one and only hobby that was turban tying was in full swing and he had thought of opening a Dastaar Academy. With support from his family and friends he opened up the same in the city of Bathinda. This academy was open for the youth to learn from Ferozepuria and even if someone was getting married would he visit them and tie their turbans. As few months passed by many ideas came to his mind and one such was to tie a turban blind folded. Many people till date think this is not possible but Manjeet has proved everyone wrong by doing such. Initially he tied his own turban blind folded and later on went on tying others turban with his eyes blinded. One had to see to believe that even blind folded Manjeet not only gave a proper shape to the turban but also each and every "lard" from starting to the end was titch perfect with accuracy. To some people it looked like it was the work of an artesian. With this very moment Manjeet's confidence grew many folds.

In 2012,at the 3rd World Kabaddi Cup, Guru Nanak Stadium, Ludhiana, Manjeet was invited by the title Sponsor to perform at the closing ceremony. His performance was appreciated by the likes of Prakash & Sukhbir Singh Badal. Later on he was also interviewed by many TV NEWS CHANNEL like PTC,Chardikala Time,CNEV News, Pothimala Halchal, Fast Way News, 7C News, Sahara Canada,Jagoo Punjab,MH1 News,Live Today,Day & Night News Channel. Apart from the on and off interviews, Star Plus called upon Manjeet for a very special performance for their show "Aapka Star Aapka Shahar" which took place in Sector-17, Chandigarh which aired on the television on 29th June, 2014 where Manjeet was successful in tying a persons turban in under a minute (precisely 59 seconds). Folllowing this programme Manjeet had other plans in relation to turban tying, one of which was to tie someone else's turban blind folded in something as less than 22 seconds. He achieved this feat with gods grace on 5th July, 2014 in Gurudwara Dukh Niwaran Sahib, Patiala. Manjeet's popularity grew by many folds and he was often invited for judgement at various state and national level turban tying competition all around India(Delhi,Punjab,Haryana,Jammu). Internationally, Manjeet has had the oppurtuntity to visit Malayasia and Singapore where he was called upon by his fans so that they could learn how to tie a turban just like him.

FEROZPURIA TURBAN ACADEMY[edit]

Tying Dastaar At My Academy
As previously mentioned in the events of his life, Manjeet Singh Ferozepuria Dastaar Academy was given birth in April, 2007 while Manjeet was graduating from college. This academy till date stands at the same location i.e. Street 12, Ajit Road (Near Dhillon Hospital), Bathinda (Punjab). People from all states and all ages whether it be Maharashtra, Kolkatta,Srinagar, Panipat, Delhi, United States of America, Canada ,UK etc have had the oppurtunity to come and learn at the Academy the different styles of Pagg. The training being imparted at this very institution is very methodological. In no sense has a shortcut been applied to learn this very art of turban tying. In less than 3 days and as much as 10 days one can learn any style of pagri from Manjeet's Academy. 2007 to present Manjeet has trained almost over 60,000 people. He's also been invited by people all around the globe for turban tying at their marriages. With this academy located in Bathinda, Manjeet plans to expand it to other major cities which are easily accessed and can cater to a larger mass of people.

Some of the awards won by Manjeet over the years have been mentioned below:-

1.)Best Turban in Ferozepur District in School Competition-2002;

2.)National Award 2nd Place in Turban Tying competition held in Delhi-2007;

3.)Virasat Mela (Bathinda), 1st Position in Turban Tying Competition-2010;

4.)Virasat Mela (Bathinda), 1st Position in Turban Tying Competition-2011;

5.)Best Turban Tying With Eyes Closed at Visakhi Mela at Damdama Sahib- 2012;

6.)Best Turban Tying in Bathinda while walking-2012;

7.)Best Turban Tying during the closing ceremony of 3rd World Kabaddi Cup on two bullets-2012;

8.)Best Turban Tying in Bathinda while riding bullet and jeep -2013;

9.)Best Turban Tying in Gurudwara Tagore Garden,Delhi with eyes closed-2013;

10.)Fastest Turban Tying in 59 seconds at Star Plus Programme, Chandigarh-2014;

11.)Turban Tying in 22 seconds in Patiala, 2014 

Monday, 15 December 2014

( Pochmi ) Pochvi Pagg Te ( Patyala ) Patiala Shahhi Pagg De Shoken Sardar Video

Turban Coach Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria 
Manjeet Singh is available to do any Contract/Booking for Tying Turban of Any Style in Punjabi & Bollywood Films Give Fantastic Looks to the Sikh Heroes 


Styles of Turban

Men’s Double Patti (Nok)

This is a very common Sikh turban style. It is very common in Punjab, India. The Nok is a double wide turban. 6 meters of turban cloth are cut in half, then into two 3 metre pieces. They are then sewn together to make it Double wide, thus creating a “Double Patti,” or a Nok turban. This turban is larger than most Sikh dastars, but contains fewer wraps around the head.

Patiala Shahi Turban

The Patiala Shahi turban was evolved over a period of time and is best suited for those with broad faces and sharp features, ethnic characteristics which exemplify Sikhs of the region.

Since its inception, however, cross migration of Sikhs within Punjab and across the diaspora has somewhat affected the style, with the true Patiala Shahi turban connoisseurs now being relatively small in number.

Even though the Patiala turban has developed into an art form, it captures a carefree spirit, mainly because the larhs (layers) on both sides are not worn in a neat or distinguished manner. Overall, it presents a round look with its rear being flat. The thumb is used to depress the cloth at the forehead to create the perfect, triangular effect with the fifty (a band of cloth worn under the turban, the colour usually chosen to match).

Other requisites of the Patiala turban include use of Finlay’s “F-74 mal-mal” fabric, at least seven-and-a-half meters of it, which is cut in half and sewn together to double the width; some light starch; and, a twist in the last larh.

Chand tora Dhamala

This style of turban is generally worn by Nihang Sikhs . This is a warrior style turban meant for going into battle. The “Chand Tora” is a metal symbol consisting of a crescent and a double edged sword, it is held in place at the front of the turban by woven chainmail cord tied in a pattern within the turban to protect the head from slashing weapons.

Amritsar Dhamala

This is the most common Dhamala turban. It consists of:
• one 5 meter piece (Pavo Blue)
• one 11 meter piece any color, commonly sabz (white) and pavo blue. Both pieces are 35 cm wide, and referred to in Amritsar as Dhamala Material.

Basic Dhamala

This is a very simple and basic Dhamala Sikh turban. This is the old style adopted by all sikh gurus and This is the most popular turban among young Sikhs of the Akhand Kirtani Jatha and also quite popular among those of Damdami Taksal in countries like America, the United Kingdom and Canada.

General Sikh Turban

Another common Sikh turban style for men. Unlike the “double patti” turban, the turban is longer and goes 7 times around the head. If you use the “Notai” technique and have a big joora (hair knot), do not make it right in front at your forehead. You will end up tying the turban on the joora, and it will make your turban look very high and big.

Patka/Kesri Turban

This is a common sikh turban among young boys. It is normally used as more of a casual Pugree, or sometimes for sports. Commonly, this is a peela (shade of yellow) coloured turban. These are the basic Sikh Pugaree types. Turban theory states that the main pugaree types are starting points, and anyone can invent their own turban styles. But keep in mind the colour, and wrap type, and amount will differentiate the LOS between pugrees, so feel free to play with LOS levels, and increase or decrease your LOS simply by trying Kavi over Peta for example.   

Thursday, 17 July 2014

Manjeet Singh Ferozpuria New World Turban Tying Record in 22 seconds blinde folded eyes With Bullet Stunts

ਦਿਲੋ ਧੰਨਵਾਦ ਜੀ ਸਾਰੇ ਦੋਸਤਾ ਮਿਤਰਾ ਦਾ ਆਪ ਸਬ ਨੇ ਆਪਣੇ ਛੋਟੇ ਵੀਰ ਦੀ ਚੱਲਦੇ ਬੁੱਲੇਟ ਪੱਗ ਬੰਨਣ ਵਾਲੀ Video ਨੂ ਬਹੋਤ ਪ੍ਯਾਰ ਦੇ ਰਹੇ ਹੋ .. 
ਗੁਰੂ ਜੀ ਮਹਾਰਾਜ ਆਪ ਸਬ ਤੇ ਕਿਰਪਾ ਕਰੇ ! 

Turban Tying With Close Eyes Only 22 Second New Chardikala Time Tv 
Share It <> http://youtu.be/jyOy0y2gni4.


Sunday, 29 September 2013

Manjit Singh is Available Any Contract Booking for Tying Turban of Any Style in Punjabi Films Give Fantastic Looks to the Sikh Heroes

  1. Manjit Singh is Available Any Contract Booking for Tying Turban of Any Style in Punjabi Films Give Fantastic Looks to the Sikh Heroes Punjabi Turban Video Download
  2. Turban training Centre Turban Tying we take pride in providing you with the best services possible in Bathinda Our goal has been to always accommodate our customers demands for the supreme services they deserve We achieve this goal through honesty and integrity.We're always early and we'll get you and your wedding party there in style and on time We are dedicated to giving responsive service to each and every customer. Manjit singh provide service to all over punjab and around.  
  3. www.punjabiturban.comUrban sikh is India's First Online Turban shop and also offers free shipping in India on all orders meta name Buy Turban Online,Buy turban,buy sikh turban,sikh turban,punjabi turban,turban india Baby Pink Baby Pink Turban Black Black Turban Blue Blue Turban Brown Brown Turban C green Cream Cream Turban Dark Brown Green Green Turban Grey Grey Turban Khalsa Orange Khalsa Orange Turban Light Pink Light Pink Turban Light Purple Maroon Maroon Red Turban Maroon Turban Mauve Orange Orchid Pink Pink Turban Purple Red White Yellow dastar sea green,BABY PINK TURBAN Khalsa Orange Turban KHALSA ORANGE TURBAN Black Turban BLACK TURBAN Army Green Turban ARMY GREEN TURBAN Navy Blue Turban NAVY BLUE TURBAN Black Patka BLACK PATKA 


Sunday, 14 July 2013

Dastar ( The Turban ) Sadi Shaan Saada Maan ( I Proud To Be a Sikh ) Ferozpuria Turban Coaching Centre In Bathinda Punjab India

World First Website Promoting Sikh Punjabi Turban World Wide Turban Coach Manjeet Singh 

                                         www.punjabiturban.com   

Ferozpuria Turban Training Centre In bathinda Punjab India World Number One pagri Coaching 


Sikhs and Their Turban  Background

Accordingly to the Biblical Terms, "Turban" means a head covering worn by men, made of cloth wrapped around the head. This fact can also be seen in respect of old paintings exhibited in the Museums and the past literature pertaining to the earlier history. During the fifteenth century when Guru Nanak Sahib (CE 1469-1539) founded the Sikh religion, India was then being ruled by the Muslim Rulers whereas Hindus were their slaves. In those days most of the Muslims and Hindus used to keep "Turbans" though some of them had also been wearing ‘caps (topi) or kulah’. From the very beginning of his childhood, Guru Nanak also continued the tradition of keeping long hair intact and covering the head by tying a Turban. This continued to be followed by his nine successors (1539 - 1708). In this respect reference could be sighted in the "Guru Granth Sahib", the Sacred Scripture of the Sikhs:

"Let living in His presence, with mind rid of impurities be your discipline. Keep the God-given body intact and with a Turban donned on your head". (GGS–Page 1084)

Historical Episode:

Although the Sikh Faith continued to be flourished gradually, when Guru Granth Sahib containing the "Gurbaani" the Divine Word was compiled in CE 1604, both the Muslim ruling class and the Hindu priestly class were alarmed because most of their people abandoned the respective religions and started following the Sikh religion because it was more appealing to them. Despite the martyrdoms of the Fifth and Ninth Gurus of the Sikhs on 30th May 1606 and 11th November 1675 respectively, most of the Hindus and Muslims did not deter from joining the newly established Sikh Faith. With a view to consolidate this renaissance, special gathering of its adherence was called at Anandpur Sahib in Punjab State. Thus by selecting Five Dear Ones, the tenth Master Guru Gobind Singh Sahib established the "Khalsa Panth" by way of Baptism: Amrit Initiation Ceremony on 30th March 1699. The Guru commanded the Sikhs: (1) To keep up their "Kes" - uncut long hair as provided by the Almighty Creator, including untrimmed beards, moustaches and eyebrows as well as to cover the head by tying a Turban for males and scarf for females; (2) to keep "Kangha" – a small wooden comb which must be placed tucked in the hair-tress and used for cleaning the hair; (3) to wear "Kara" - a loose steel ring on right hand wrest; (4) to wear "Kaschehra" - specially designed breeches and (5) to carry "Kirpaan" - a small sheathed sword in baldric. These articles of Faith were made compulsory for the Sikhs so that their appearance remains distinctive from that of Buddhists, Hindus, Jains, Muslims and other communities.

Identity struggle

The tying of a Turban and keeping unshorn long hair gave the Sikhs a unique and an easily recognizable identity all over the world. This distinctive identity of the Sikhs led them into various religious, cultural and political struggles throughout their history and that the sacrifices, which the Sikhs made during those struggles resulted in strengthening their resolve. The worst period of persecution of the Sikhs and the most malicious discrimination against them was during the first half of the eighteenth century when not only was their identity at stake, but also, their very survival. The Mughal Emperors of India – Bahadur Shah (1707-1712), Farrukh Siyar (1712-1719), Mohammad Shah (1719-1748) and Ahmad Shah (1748-1754) had ordered an indiscriminate massacre of the Sikhs with a view to stop them from practicing the beliefs of their Faith and from obeying the commandments of their Gurus. The Sikhs preferred to lay down their lives rather than allow their hair to be shaved or Turban to be removed. Aided and abetted by the Hindu slaves, Mir Manu, the provincial Muslim Governor of the Punjab, during the regime of Mohammad Shah, was the most cruel of all the corrupt administrators of the dissolute Mughal monarchs. He was determined to exterminate the entire population of the Sikhs who lived mainly in the Punjab at that time. So hard were the ordeals through which the Sikhs (also known as Khalsa or Singhs after Amrit Initiation) had to pass through but they survived with honour and established the Sikh Rule between 1764-1849.

Sikhs under British Rule (1849-1947

Having witnessing their bravery, British Raj preferred the recruitment of the Sikhs in their armed forces. The Sikh soldiers faced the showers of bullets and shells of heavy guns and the fiercest enemy bombardments, wearing "Turbans" instead of steel helmets. Sikh valour while defending "Saragarhi" in Afghanistan on 12th September 1897 is well known to the British Parliament when unprecedented bravery of all the (22) heroes was narrated. It is a matter of great pride for the Sikhs that this battle of epic dimensions is taught to children in France, and it is one of the eight stories of collective bravery published by UNESCO.

During the First World War while fighting in the battle of Gallipoli (Turkey) on 3rd and 4th June 1915, 14th Sikh Regiment lost 371 brave officers and soldiers. Not an inch of ground was given up and not a single straggler came back. The ends of the enemy’s trenches were found blocked with the bodies of Sikhs and of the enemy who died fighting at close quarters. This was the high spirit of the Turbaned Khalsa soldiers. During the First and Second World Wars, 83,055 Turban wearing Sikh soldiers laid down their lives and 109,045 were wounded when fighting under the command of Allied Forces. For reference one may read "British Empire, 1914/1920 War", page 237 and "Casualties in the Second World War 1939-45", published in 1951. Sikh soldiers also died while defending the British ruled territories – Burma, Singapore and Papua New Guinea where Rabaul Cemetery can be visited so close to Australia.

Turbaned Sikhs in India

In India the Sikh Turban is accepted and well respected. All Sikh personnel who are serving in the Indian Armed Forces are authorized to wear Turbans and their Uniform includes: 1. Turban - (as the main headgear to cover their uncut long hair). 2. Sikh Underwear. 3. Sikh Comb. 4. Kirpan. 5. Kara. (Source: Constitution of India - Defence Services Regulations of 1962, Para 1385, Clause d). However, for the last two decades, Sikhs are being harassed and oppressed by the Indian Hindu Governments through its secret agencies and aided Hindu organizations. Like other nations, Sikhs continue to aspire to have their own independent State of Punjab by way of peaceful means.

Diaspora Turbaned Sikhs

In spite of the historical evidence, in recent years, the Sikhs have been subjected to various unpleasant laws relating to the ‘Turban’ in other countries outside India where the laws clashed with their religious requirement. One such law is to wear a steel helmet while riding on motorcycles or when working in the construction or mining sectors, etc. In most of the countries Sikhs have been forced to spend a lot of their time and money in establishing that their Turban is an integral part of their dress and that a Turban is their only headgear and one of their significant identities. However, it is satisfying to realize that some enlightened governments do respect the religious and cultural difference and that they have responded positively to the demands of the Sikhs.

The Government of Malaysia allowed the Sikhs to wear a Turban instead of a crash helmet in the year 1973: "Since the Constitution respects religions of other races, we cannot force Sikhs with turbans to wear crash helmets. Sikhs who wear Turbans need not wear crash helmets when they ride Motor Cycles or Scooters". Likewise, the Governments of Singapore and that of Australia showed fairness and exempted the Sikhs from wearing crash helmets. They have been allowed to wear Turban as their only headgear. In accordance with the Motor-Cycle Crash Helmets (Religious Exemption) Act passed by the British Parliament in 1976, Section 2A exempts "any follower of the Sikh religion while he is wearing a turban" from having to wear a crash helmet. Similarly, the highest Court of the United Kingdom, the House of Lords, has ruled that Sikh drivers and conductors of public vehicles are not to be compelled to wear caps. Also in Canada in 1986 Sikhs in Metro Toronto Police were permitted to wear Turbans while on duty, and since 1990 Turbaned Sikhs may join The Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP).

Hate Crimes against Sikhs since 11th September 2001

After the forced crash of four ill-fated passenger aeroplanes in USA on 11th September 2001, Turbaned Sikhs are being targeted as if they are associated with the Afghanistan’s Taliban or Osama Bin Laden because most of them also wear turbans. Although there was not a single Turbaned Sikh on board, it is not clear why citizens of USA in particular and others in general are so ignorant about the unique identity of the Sikhs when there are at least half a million Sikhs living in America? Umpteen times it has been established that Sikhs neither fall within the category of the Hindus or Muslims, nor they are associated with the Afghani Taliban or Osama Bin Laden.

By virtue of the Australian Constitution, Federal and State laws, there is hardly any discrimination based on any person’s religion, appearance, colour, disability, language or race. Accordingly, all the citizens of Australia deserve and enjoy equal opportunity and rights. Unfortunately, due to ignorance of some troublemakers, Sikhs do experience unpleasant situations when they are humiliated. We are living in the civilized 21st Century and there are laws to deal with criminals and other offenders. Irrespective of any ones appearance or religion if any person commits any offence, local Police has every right to investigate and then initiate court proceedings. Then it is up to the Courts to pronounce judgements by according suitable punishment when any one is found guilty. Hence no hooligan should harass any person. All the citizens/residents should be treated with courtesy and respect. If someone still has any doubt, let him read the Book:

"The Man in the Red Turban" by David Martin – 1978, published by Hutchinson Group of Australia. Then you will better understand Sardar Ganda Singh’s character based on teachings of the Sikh religion.

Significance of Turban

It may again be stated that for a Sikh, Turban - (also known as Dastaar, Pagg, Paggri) is an integral part and parcel of his religion. It is representative of the religious identity and national cohesion for the Sikh Nation spread all over the world. A Sikh with a Turban - (Dastaar) is conspicuous among the crowds of thousands. It is made of fine cotton muslin unstitched cloth having length about five metres and one metre wide. When tying Turban daily both ends of the length of the Turban must be tucked in properly, i. e. the beginning and finishing ends should not be flowing loosely as can be seen with many non-Sikh persons. There is no significance of any particular colour because it could be of any colour. The Sikhs’ Turban is more hygienic than a cap, hat or helmet, which are difficult to wash whereas Turban is kept clean with the usual washing. It is also ideal headgear for both winter and summer. Even in icy winds, it keeps the head and ears warm. For a Sikh, his Turban is more than a Crown because it is considered as a gift blessed by the Sikh Gurus. As Sikhs are easily recognizable by their Turban and bearded faces, these also serve them as helpful deterrents against undesirable acts and behaviour and keep them on the right path. Sikhism shuns drinking, smoking, intoxicants, etc.

Sikh Brethren Awake!

These days some Sikhs are replacing Turban by a small piece of cloth or cap on their heads. Do they want to lose their Sikh identity out of fashion or ignorance or to imitate other persons/communities? O Brothers! You are being eclipsed. You are being deviated by the cleverer people and being victimized. You are being deprived of your character. Your manly look is being effeminated. Nay, you are being disfigured. You are being made a victim of the vices. You are being duped by flimsy honours. Your Turban is being taken off. It has brought you all the honours in past. It has made you a "Sardaar", why loose it? Remember, our great Heritage is our Pride. Why to lose it? Recollect the Greatness of our Guru Sahib and sacrifices of Four Sahibzadeys and thousands brave Sikhs to whom we daily remember in our Prayer. Let us adapt ourselves in the image of Guru Gobind Singh Sahib. Maintain your relations with your Guru and preserve your position of a Singh of the Guru. That is the only secret behind our Name and Fame in the World. "Keep your head high with a Turban intact and Take care of it". We should always remember Guru Gobind Singh’s Divine Word: "So long as the Khalsa maintains his Identity, He shall remain imbued with my vitality". A word of caution: Those Sikhs who have cut off or trimmed their hair and beards and do not tying Turbans, fall in the category of ‘apostates’ until they regain entry by undergoing Amrit Initiation Ceremony.